It was our youngest granddaughter who gave the Hardaway Cottage my favorite name as only Ellie could. After seeing the house for the first time she nonchalauntly said “I think we should call the house “The Grand Old Lady.” I could not agree more. And this week the Lady got curves. As noted in another post, we designed the front porch early in the process. 

You can see a design choice that helps soften the starkness of the house. The curved corners of the porch were designed to make a strong statement and add great visual interest. Easy to draw, more difficult to make in the real world. Glad to say that the beast has been tamed. The internet is filled with all sorts of methods for doing construction projects. When it comes to deck construction it is more difficult to find ideas that also pass current Georgia building codes. Here are images of the deck without the curved corners. The joist structure is almost complete except for the access ramp, stairs, decking, 52 corner braces, 96 joist hangers with 10 nails each, 300 hurricane clips with 10 nails each, and rounded front corners. OK, still some work to go.

Building curves on a deck can be done in several ways. A small calculation was necessary to determine the circumference of the complete circle then the 1/4 portion I was using to make the curve. 

I used a 36″ radius which would make the 1/4 turn on the corner officially 55.5″ long. I extended it to 60″ length for a slightly sharper corner. I used a nail, string, and pencil to mark the arc of the curve on the joists so that I could cut them to support the curved section. Next, I kerf cut the 2x8 every inch along the 60″ section. The board was extended by 12″ on each side of the kerf cuts to allow for a nailing section. I cut to a depth of 1″. This left 1/2″ of material that became 

flexible to make the curve. One board bent easily with this cut. A second board required an additional 1/4″ depth on the kerf cut to bend correctly. The third board broke at one of the kerf cuts due to a knot. Here is the process. 

So, The Lady has Curves. I did the center inside radius by flipping the board and exposing the kerf cuts. I will use a 1/4″ ply to cover the cuts. With some glue in the kerfs it will firm up nicely. 

Now on to hurricane clip and joist hangers. If you have never owned or used a palm nailer, you must get one. To hammer 2,400 hanger nails in tight spaces by hand is murder. The mini palm nailer was worth every penny of the $40 investment.